Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Ulrich Johan Jacob Stehley (1700-1776)

Passengers abroad the Pink Plaisance, which landed at the port of Philadelphia; September 21, 1732

Name: Ulrich Staley, Stehli, Stiely, Stelley  Religion: "Swiss Mennonite" FA1: SEP 1732 Arrived in Philadelphia on the ship "Pink Plaisance". ________________________List of foreigners imported in the ship "Pink Plaisance",John Paret, Master, from Rotterdam. (Holland) Qualified Sept. 21 1732. STELLEY, Ulrich...............................32 STALLEY, Anna.................................27 STELEY, Hans Peter STELIN, Anna Barbra(Steley)______________________________________________________________________Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Name: Ulrich Steley Year: 1732 Age: 32 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1700 Place: America Family Members: Wife Anna 27; Child Hans Peter; Child Anna Barbra Source Publication Code: 8042 Primary Immigrant: Steley, Ulrich Annotation:
Date and place of arrival or settlement. Periodical published by Pennsylvania Folklife Society, P.O. Box 92, Collegeville, PA, 19426. Also see no. 9968 below. Source Bibliography: SCHELBERT, LEO, and SANDRA LUEBKING. "Swiss Mennonite Family Names: An Annotated Checklist." In Pennsylvania Folklife, vol. 26:4 (Summer 1977), pp. 2-24. Page: 20

Much of the background of the Mennonite movement is to be traced directly to Switzerland. This movement was active back in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and records indicate attempts to root these people out because of their refusal to bear arms, a trait they adhere to today with all the tenacity they can command.
The government in time of war can make Mennonite and Amish boys rake leaves, but can't get them to bear arms!
Mennonite communities had existed in the Palatinate since 1527, and to these places like-believers in Switzerland would flee across frontiers; by 1671 a considerable emigration took place when seven hundred persons left their native home to settle on the banks of the Rhine.
We are now approaching the time when these early Mennonite settlers in the Palatinate and the newcomers agreed to help their compatriots in Switzerland who left there in after years--willingly, or otherwise. They finally found themselves under such a heavy yoke that they decided on a large movement of their people to America, and the settlement at Pequea, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, resulted.
Zurich and Berne, in Switzerland, published decrees forbidding emigration, the latter city rescinding a policy previously planned, for a Swiss colony to settle in Georgia, and up through the Carolinas.
The main reasons for emigration from Europe to America, by the Germans, motivated and included also the Huguenots; the latter got into this picture by reason of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, by Louis XIV, in France, in 1685, when many of France's most substantial citizens went to Holland, Germany and Switzerland, all in fear of their lives.
In connection with the subject of enforced slavery it may be noted that Huguenots from France were likewise sold as galley slaves. In 1896, Henry S. Dotterer, editor of "Historical Notes Relating to the Pennsylvania Reformed Church," was making some researches in the archives of Dordrecht, Holland. Here he discovered a printed list of Huguenot galley slaves who had been released by order of Louis XIV of France, on condition that they leave the realm.

Lancaster Pennsylvania
Wherever there was limestone or black walnut trees, there you would soon find Germans either farming, or setting up a home prior to turning the soil, for they liked limestone. This for the reason it made fine stone for building homes and churches, as well as lime for fertilizer. Walnut trees growing in healthy stands were also a good sign of fertility of the soil.
Lands Quickly Taken Up.-Once the lands on the east side of the Susquehanna were well taken up, the movements went to the west, and to the north, York and Cumberland timber falling early under the axe of the pioneer farmer and woodsman. The spread was not long in coming, once the troubles with the Indians were controlled.
The Revolution was to prove that the Germans were loyal to the land they had come to populate and to cultivate. And if they fought against the principles and demands of the English crown, they did it alongside hardlaced and stiffbacked Presbyterians whose veins were filled with blood like that of the enemy they fought.

But you must give the Germans their due: they were not among the last to fight--but among the first. It was not the Mennonite who fought with ball and musket--he fought with the plow. Others of his countrymen who had no scruples about "bearing arms" were the ones who went out with Washington to wallop the would-be "tax-leviers." 
Those who did not fight were self-sustaining and self-sufficient, and their efforts at farming and making warm clothing, and those who made shot and shell, contributed no little in making a revolution of the people an American independence indeed. 
In this group of arrivals after 1710, there must be noted that a number of Pennsylvania Germans under the leadership of Jost Hite, moved down the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, to settle the counties of Frederick, Rockingham and Shenandoah. The west- ern part of North Carolina had a large number of such settlers emigrate from Pennsylvania. The French and Indian War was still simmering when some Pennsylvania Germans went to Ohio, to be followed bv larger numbers at the close of the Revolution. Then to Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, Texas, California, etc.
People in those states to the west of us probably feel that they are "Westerners," but would it be improper to say that they are in a large sense "Western Pennsylvania Germans?" or "Pennsylvania Germans in the West?" 
The Pennsylvania German farers were good farmers by practically all standards. They were descended through thirty generations of tillers of the soil. All things being equal in their Old World haunts they would have been on the average well-to-do. But the wars kept them poor, or, if they were on the wrong side of the political or religious "fence" they again were likely to be mulct of what they had.Travel, being what it was in those days, was expensive, and the more so because unscrupulous ship owners found they could get the price, either from the pioneer or some one who would pay for this passage. 
Those who undertook to pay off their passage under a bond which sometimes took twenty years to redeem, would be termed "redemptioners." This took on a form of "white servitude" in the early days, and much of interest may be read about the subject.
Fine Soil Ready in Pennsylvania. - It has been pointed out that the situation greeting the newcomers was pretty nearly made to order. There was little barrenness; fertilization was not necessary in the same degree that it was in Germany, where tilling for many years required more attention.
The farmers were smart enough to rotate their crops; they grazed cattle for fattening and got back fertilizer quite precious. They fed their horses well, so that they could do twice as much work in a day as horses underfed; they were kept warm in winter, and were excused from doing extra work, such as dragging logs, or pleasure driving.
"Swiss Barns" Erected. - The early pioneers first cleared sufficient land to get a start on farming; then came an immense barn, well built, of the "Swiss" type. The first barns were built of logs. Later there were some of stone, then frame or brick. Interesting features of some of the barns included the stars on the sides and ends; also the ventilator designs obtained by omissions of bricks which formed the designs, or cut-outs in the odd shapes of hearts, diamonds, quarter-moons, clubs, etc.
Most barns were double-deckers, and allowed for threshing-floors, mows and lofts for storing bay. The complete barns had a granary on the upper floor, a cellar under the drive-way, in addition to the usual stalls for horses and cattle. They ranged from 50 to 60 feet wide, and 60 to 120 feet long, with an overhang of 8 to 10 feet beyond the stable doors.
Originally barns and houses had thatched roofs; in later years they were shingled, slated, or tinned. If painted, it generally was of deep red, for lasting qualities.
Lumber could be obtained on the spot; likewise good building stone might be found nearby, needing but the blows of the stone mason to dress them for use. But it might be a decade or two until they got around to the building of a substantial house. Houses built by the poineers were generally of logs, if the builder was pioneering some miles away from centers of population. These could be built in a few days after a clearing was made.
Two-story houses were the general rule at the out- set, with the familiar two-and-a-half-story to follow. The first with pitched roof, and with cornices run across the gables and around the first story.
Types of Construction. - The English and Scotch fashion was to build the chimney at the gable-end, but the German style was to bring it right up through the center of the house. Most of them seemed to be spacious, with open fire-places in most rooms, and with deep-set window and door frames. Window weights were used quite early.
Travelers usually note on these older houses the odd inscriptions, verses, dates or initials found well up on the gable wall. This is a hangover from customs in Germany and Switzerland.
There are many variations held by people today as to the meanings of the decorations on barns, cer- tain markings found here and there on houses and necessary outbuildings; even on cooking utensils, etc. 
Gaudy Colors and Designs. - It will hardly suffice to say that the farmer liked to have his barn look attractive, and to be in good state of repair, as a sign of his progress and success; nor that his wife was odd, in that she had a lot of dishes with gaudy decorations of birds, flowers, alphabets, scenes and verses painted thereon; nor that the good housewife had these same decorations on her bed linens, and her furniture as well.
Most of the decorative schemes came from the Old World, a throw-off, or hand-me-down from ancient Persian and Chinese ideas. We are informed that German houses today have on their walls counterparts of many of the ideas expressed by our own native artists with a slight touch or blend of native instinct which do not in the least detract from the value or interest of the items in question.
The farmers were not alone the great builders. We had the well-known preachers and teachers; scientists and astronomers; inventors and many others. A catalog of German firsts in Pennsylvania is an imposing array of talent and accomplishment.

German Language Remained with Newcomer. - Of the language and literature of the Pennsylvania Germans we had at best be brief-the students and scholars are still trying to define and settle the matter.
The remarkable thing about the "dialect" as it is called, is that there should remain so much of it in use today in sections where there is likewise an abundant use of English. Two hundred years ago there was every reason for them to continue using the only language they knew. With all the intermarriages of these people with English, Scotch and Irish families, the "Dutch" will "out."
From the days of their residence in Europe, until comparatively modern times they have been without the benefit of any grammar or book of guidance for the use of the "dialect" conversation on the street or in the home.
Early Printers. - The Pennsylvania Germans had printing shops in operation in larger centers of population almost as soon at they could get the material to set up shop.
Thus the press of Christopher Sauer had printed three editions of the Bible, complete, in little Germantown, before there was one edition of the same book printed in Philadelphia in English. A few years before his first Bible Sauer had printed a large hymn-book entitled "Zionitischer Wayrauchshugel," containing 654 hymns in 33 divisions. 
Conrad Beissel and his Ephrata "Breuderschaft" were responsible for the publishing of a number of remarkable books for those times, including a complete translation of Van Bragt's "Blutige Schauplatz oder Martyrer Spiegel" in German from the Holland Dutch, at the Cloisters, at Ephrata. Fifteen men worked for three years to complete translations, make the paper and print and bind this massive work, up to that time about the largest single book published in the New World.
Education was at first frowned on by the farmers who thought their children needed little more than to be able to read and *rite and figure a little bit. In later years they found that education was the best bet, and with the exception of the Amish, most other denominations and sects have gone over to college education. 
The German language, or dialect as it is more familiarly known, gave way in part to English as the official language of the Commonwealth in 1836. But it did not "give way" in many homes, and towns!

Variety of Faiths: - The religious background and life of the Germans is varied, to say the least. We have little space to detail them at length, but separate ac- counts may be found in libraries for particular readers.
The German Baptists, or Brethren, are a denomination of Christians who emigrated to this country from Germany between the years 1718 and 1730; they are commonly called Dunkers; but they have assumed for themselves the name of "Brethren."
The United Brethren in Christ came into activity in the United States about 1755, differing in name from the Moravians, or Unitas Fratrum, (or United Brethren's Church) by adding "in Christ." The former mentioned denomination enjoys a healthy membership scattered throughout the country.
The Moravians (Unitas Fratrum), or United Brethren's Church, dates from 1722, descendants of the Bohemian and Moravian Brethren who were persecuted in their native country, and who founded a colony under the patronage of Count Zinzendorf, on an estate of his in Upper Lusatia. American history is replete with accounts of activities of the Count, and David Zeisberger, who labored among and learned so much from his association with Indian tribes. Their establishments in the early days were primarily at Bethlehem, Nazareth and. Lititz.
The Schwenkfelders take their name from Casper Schwenkfeld von Ossing, who was born seven years after Martin Luther, with whom he had manv disagreements. This denomination arrived in Philadelphia on September 22, 1734, settling principally in Montgomery, Berks, Bucks and Lehigh counties.
Ephrata Cloister. - One of the most notable of the early pietist movements was this Ephrata community, under Conrad Beissel, who was born in Eberbach, in 1690. He was a baker, as was his father. He came to America in 1720, becoming a hermit on the Cocalico. Others built cabins around him and imitated his ascetic life. But any religion that prohibits race propagation soon eliminates itself.


Ulrich Johan Jacob Stehley* (1700 - 1776)

is our 5th great grandfather
Daughter of Ulrich Johan Jacob Stehley and Anna Maria Germann
Son of Mary Steel and John Stewart
Son of James Stewart and Jean Reid
Son of James Stewart and Phoebe Hinton Cox
Daughter of Noah Stewart and Mary Springer
Son of Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute
 

Monday, December 17, 2012

Nicholas Martiau (1597-1657)

We have a strong connection to the French Huguenots in both the Lute tree and the Bramblett tree.

Nicholas Martiau, a French Huguenot, had lived some period of time in England before being naturalized as an Englishman and sailing for Virginia. He had been born in France according to his own statement in the records of the General Court of Virginia and furthermore is believed to have been a protestant as the records of the French Huguenot congregation in London show him to have been a godfather at a baptism there in May 1615.
 
Martiau arrived in Virginia in 1620. The records of the Virginia Company show that by February 1620 the colony had requested that engineers be sent out who were capable of raising fortifications. The Earl of Huntington, who had an interest in lands in the colony, engaged at his own expense two engineers, one a captain from the low countries named Benjamin Blewitt and the other a reputedly skilled French captain who had been long in England, Nicholas Martiau. Huntington specifically engaged them to act as his attorneys in establishing his lands in Virginia. To that end he saw that Martiau was naturalized, a necessary qualification to own land, vote, or hold office in the colony, and he also provided him with a life interest in some lands of the Huntington estate.

         Martiau arrived on the Francis Bona Ventura in August 1620. After the Indian massacre in March 1622 he commanded a company which sought out and fought the Indians. For a while after that he was at Falling Creek where the colony's iron works had been destroyed and the population devastated in the massacre. From there in 1623 he testified to the exemplary services of Doctor Ed Giften. In 1623 he was a member of the House of Burgesses that signed the completed draft of the First Laws made by the Assembly in Virginia. By the time of the census of 1624, Blewitt was no longer in the Virginia records and Capt Nicholas Martiau of Elizabeth City was the Earl's sole attorney in Virginia. In 1625 he appears in the muster as Captain Martiau, age 33.  

    In March 1623, the Commissioners sent from London to investigate conditions in Virginia questioned where the colony should be fortified, and received from the Assembly the answer that the best defense against Indians would be a 6 mile palisade from Martin's Hundred to Chiskiacke, the future site of Yorktown. In 1630 Governor Harvey and the council voted lands for those who would settle in the first two years in Chiskiacke and upon completion of the palisade Martiau was among those who moved their families to Chiskiacke. In 1632 as a burgess from Chiskiacke and the Isle of Kent, he signed the petition to the crown for confirmation of the title to all of the colonists' lands. Martiau's plantation eventually included 1300 acres among which is the site of Yorktown today.  

As a prominent public figure Martiau appears frequently in the records thereafter. He was elected burgess from Chiskiacke and the Isle of Kent in 1632 and was a justice of York County from 1633 until his death, often holding meetings of the court in his home. In the prelude to the famous "Thrusting out of Sir John Harvey", a challenge to autocratic rule, Nicholas Martiau was one of three speakers who by their opposition forced the governor to return to London to report to the king. At two other times occasions arose requiring Martiau to prove his loyalty to the crown: in 1627 he was required by the General Court to take the "Oath of Supremacy", and in 1656 it was recorded in Northampton County that "Captain Nicholas Martiau obtained his denizenation in England and could hold any office or employment in Virginia."

Little is known about Martiau's wife. In a letter dated December 1625 written in Elizabeth City and addressed to the Earl of Huntington Martiau announces himself as a husband and a father of "little ones". His wife, Jane, of unknown surname had apparently arrived on the Sea Flower in 1621, then been married to Lieutenant Bartley, and widowed by 1625. She in turn appears to have died before 1640. There is some supposition that there had been a first wife before Mrs. Bartley. 

There was a third marriage before November 1646 to a widow, Isabella Beech, who apparently died before Martiau died about 1657.       Nicholas Martiau was survived by three daughters of his second marriage: Elizabeth married to Colonel George Read, Mary married to Colonel John Scasbrook, and Sarah married to Captain William Fuller, the Puritan Governor of Maryland under the Commonwealth.

         References: 1. "Nicholas Martiau: The Adventurous Huguenot, The Military Engineer and The Earliest American Ancestor of George Washington", by John Baer Stoudt, Norristown, PA, 1932

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History of French Huguenots
The Huguenots were French Protestants most of whom eventually came to follow the teachings of John Calvin, and who, due to religious persecution, were forced to flee France to other countries in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Some remained, practicing their Faith in secret.
The Protestant Reformation began by Martin Luther in Germany about 1517, spread rapidly in France, especially among those having grievances against the established order of government. As Protestantism grew and developed in France it generally abandoned the Lutheran form, and took the shape of Calvinism. The new "Reformed religion" practiced by many members of the French nobility and social middle-class, based on a belief in salvation through individual faith without the need for the intercession of a church hierarchy and on the belief in an individual's right to interpret scriptures for themselves, placed these French Protestants in direct theological conflict with both the Catholic Church and the King of France in the theocratic system which prevailed at that time. Followers of this new Protestantism were soon accused of heresy against the Catholic government and the established religion of France, and a General Edict urging extermination of these heretics (Huguenots) was issued in 1536. Nevertheless, Protestantism continued to spread and grow, and about 1555 the first Huguenot church was founded in a home in Paris based upon the teachings of John Calvin. The number and influence of the French Reformers (Huguenots) continued to increase after this event, leading to an escalation in hostility and conflict between the Catholic Church/State and the Huguenots. Finally, in 1562, some 1200 Huguenots were slain at Vassey, France, thus igniting the French Wars of Religion which would devastate France for the next thirty-five years.
The Edict of Nantes, signed by Henry IV in April, 1598, ended the Wars of Religion, and allowed the Huguenots some religious freedoms, including free exercise of their religion in 20 specified towns of France.
The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes by Louis XIV in October, 1685, began anew persecution of the Huguenots, and hundreds of thousands of Huguenots fled France to other countries. The Promulgation of the Edict of Toleration in November, 1787, partially restored the civil and religious rights of Huguenots in France.
Since the Huguenots of France were in large part artisans, craftsmen, and professional people, they were usually well-received in the countries to which they fled for refuge when religious discrimination or overt persecution caused them to leave France. Most of them went initially to Germany, the Netherlands, and England, although some found their way eventually to places as remote as South Africa. Considerable numbers of Huguenots migrated to British North America, especially to the Carolinas, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New York. Their character and talents in the arts, sciences, and industry were such that they are generally felt to have been a substantial loss to the French society from which they had been forced to withdraw, and a corresponding gain to the communities and nations into which they settled.




Origin of the Word HuguenotThe exact origin of the word Huguenot is unknown, but many consider it to be a combination of Flemish and German. Protestants who met to study the Bible in secret were called Huis Genooten, meaning "house fellows." They were also referred to as Eid Genossen, or "oath fellows" meaning persons bound by an oath. Two possible but different derivations incorporating this concept can be found in the Encyclopedia Britannica:
1.   "Huguenot", according to Frank Puaux, at one time President of the Socitie Francaise de l'Historie du Protestantisme Francais and author of the article about the Huguenots in the eleventh edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica:

"is the name given from about the middle of the sixteenth century to the Protestants of France. It was formerly explained as coming from the German Eldgenosen, the designation of the people of Geneva at the time when they were admitted to the Swiss Confederation. This explanation is now abandoned. The words HuguenotHuguenots, are old French words, common in fourteenth and fifteenth-century charters. As the Protestants called the Catholics papistes, so the Catholics called the protestantshuguenots. The Protestants at Tours used to assemble by night near the gate of King Hugo, whom the people regarded as a spirit. A monk, therefore, in a sermon declared that the Lutherans ought to be called Huguenots, as kinsmen of King Hugo, inasmuch as they would only go out at night as he did. This nickname became popular from 1560 onwards, and for a long time the French Protestants were always known by it."
2.   The current edition Encyclopedia Britannica offers a somewhat different explanation, although agreeing the word is a derivative of the German word Eldgenosen:

"The origin of the name is uncertain, but it appears to have come from the word aignos, derived from the German Eldgenosen (confederates bound together by oath), which used to describe, between 1520 and 1524, the patriots of Geneva hostile to the duke of Savoy. The spelling Huguenot may have been influenced by the personal nameHugues, "Hugh"; a leader of the Geneva movement was one Besancon Hugues (d. 1532)."


Nicholas(French Huguenot) Martiau *Capt. (1591 - 1657)

is our 8th great grandfather
Daughter of Nicholas(French Huguenot) Martiau and Elizabeth Jane Berkeley
Son of Elizabeth Martin and Col George Reade
Son of Andrew Reade and Unknown
Daughter of Andrew Reid and Isabelle Barr
Daughter of Jean Reid and John Reid
Son of Jean Reid and James Stewart
Son of James Stewart and Phoebe Hinton Cox
Daughter of Noah Stewart and Mary Springer
Son of Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute







Thursday, December 13, 2012

Sir Edward Dymoke (1508-1566)

Sir Edward Dymoke was sheriff of the county of Lincoln in the life-time of his father, anno 1536; an office which he also filled in the 1st Edward VI [1547] and 2nd and 3rd of Philip and Mary [1555 and 1556], as well as in that of Queen Elizabeth, he was repeatedly returned as one of this county's representatives to parliament. He officiated as Champion at the coronations of Edward VI, Queen Mary, and Queen Elizabeth. 


Dymoke, the name of an English family holding the office of king's champion. The functions of the champion were to ride into Westminster Hall at the coronation banquet, and challenge all comers to impugn the kings title. The earliest record of the ceremony at the coronation of an English king dates from the accession of Richard II. On this occasion the champion was Sir John Dymoke (d. 1381), who held the manor of Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire, in right of his wife Margaret, granddaughter of Joan Ludlow, who was the daughter and co-heiress of Philip Marmion, last Baron Marmion. The Marmions claimed descent from the lords of Fontenay, hereditary champions of the dukes of Normandy, and held the castle of Tamworth, Leicestershire, and the manor of Scrivelsby. The right to the championship was disputed with the Dymoke family by Sir Baldwin de Freville, lord of Tamworth, who was descended from an elder daughter of Philip Marmion. The court of claims eventually decided in favor of the owners of Scrivelsby on the ground that Scrivelsby was held in grand serjeanty, that is, that its tenure was dependent on, rendering a special service, in this case the championship.

Sir Thomas Dymoke (1428?-1471) joined a Lancastrian rising in 1469, and, with his brother-in-law Richard, Lord Willoughby and Welles, was beheaded in 1471 by order of Edward IV after he had been induced to leave sanctuary on a promise of personal safety. The estates were restored to his son Sir Robert Dymoke (d. 1546), champion at the coronations of Richard III, Henry VII, and Henry VIII, who distinguished himself at the Siege of Tournai and became treasurer of the kingdom. His descendants acted as champions at successive coronations. After the coronation of George IV the ceremony was allowed to lapse, but at the coronation of King Edward VII H. S. Dymoke bore the standard of England in Westminster Abbey. Complete Peerage, The
Following the ceremony in Westminster Abbey the Coronation procession of King George IV now wearing his crown wended its way to Westminster Hall on the raised and canopied processional way. " The awning over the platform on which the Coronation procession is to pass, is of Russia duck, and 2,000,000 yds. will be required to complete it." Crowds lined the streets to watch the parade pass. Wealthy spectators could book seats on platforms erected for the occasion. " Ten thousand Guineas were given by a person for the fronts of four houses, in Palace-yard, to hire for seeing the Coronation. He must have lost considerably, as places were to be had on the day so low as ten shillings and sixpence and even seven shillings and Sixpence." Soldiers both on foot and on horseback lined the route.

The coronation dinner was held in the huge 290 by 68 foot Westminster Hall. The mediaeval banqueting Hall dating from 1099 is topped by a magnificent oak hammer beam ceiling. The King was escorted to his place by the Barons of the Cinque Ports who traditionally have the right to hold the canopy over the king on the occasion of the Coronation Processions. Once the King was seated the Lord High Constable, the Lord High Steward and the Deputy Earl Marshal rode into the hall on horseback. The Deputy Earl Marshal had difficulty with his horse and swore at the animal in a voice that resounded through Westminster Hall. The Hereditary Champion, a member of the family of Dymoke of Scrivelsby, in full armor rode a horse into the Coronation Banquet in Westminster Hall to throw down his gauntlet and challenge anyone to deny the new sovereign.
The rider was actually the son of the hereditary Champion as Rev. John Dymoke thought it incompatible with his profession as a clergyman to appear as an armored Champion. The family, perhaps forewarned by the problems of previous Champions, took the precaution of borrowing a white horse from Astley's circus for the ceremony. The animal was well used to enclosed spaces and crowds and the Champion's part of the ceremony went off perfectly. After no one had taken up the Gauntlet, George IV drank to the Champion from a gold cup. It was passed to the Champion, Henry Dymoke (1801-1865), who also drank from it and then took it away as his rightful trophy of the day. This ceremony ceased after George IV's coronation in 1821. Then it was the turn of the peers and bishops at the long tables to drink his Majesty's health followed by the customary rounds of cheering. The King stood up to thank them for their good wishes and to do them " the honour of drinking their health and that of his good people" . The Earl of Denbigh wrote, " It exceeded all imagination and conception. Picture to yourself Westminster Hall lined beneath with the peers in their robes and coronets, the Privy Councilors, Knights of the Bath, and a multitude of different attendants and chief officers of State in most magnificent dress, and with a double row of galleries on each side above, filled with all the beauty of London, the ladies vying with each other in the magnificence of their apparel and the splendor of their head-dresses. Some of them being literally a blaze of diamonds."

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Sir Edward Dymoke is the Great Grandfather of George Washington, our first president.

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The Manor of Scrivelsby, part of Scrivelby civil parish, is in the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England, 2 miles (3.2 km) south from Horncastle and on the B1183 road 1 mile (1.6 km) east from the A153 road. The manor is held by grand serjeanty,[1] a form of tenure which requires the performance of a service rather than a money payment – in this case as the King or Queen's Champion.[1] Scrivelsby appears in the Domesday Book as "Scrivelesbi".[2] It comprised 89 households, 16 villagers, 11 smallholders and 30 freemen, with 8.5 ploughlands, a meadow of 5 acres (0.020 km2), woodland of 100 acres (0.40 km2), a mill and a church. In 1086 lordship of the manor and tenancy-in-chief was transferred to Robert the bursar,[3] alternatively Robert De Spencer,[4] but shortly after the Conquest it was given to Robert De Marmyion, Lord of Fountenay, on condition that he accept the office of King's Champion.[4] The manor house, Scrivelsby Court, was burnt out in 1761,[6] and was demolished between 1955 and 1957.[6] However the gatehouse was retained and restored in 1959.[6] The west front is predominately 15- and 16th-century, with the rest, being Georgian and later.[6] It is a Grade I listed building.[7] The Lion Gateway was built around 1530 and was rebuilt in 1833.[6][8] It is Grade II* listed.[8] 

Edward "Sheriff of Lincoln" Dymoke *Sir (1508 - 1566)
is our 10th great grandfather

Frances Dymoke * (1539 - 1611)
Daughter of Edward "Sheriff of Lincoln" and Lady Anne Tailboys

Mildred Windebank * (1585 - 1630)
Daughter of Frances Dymoke and Thomas Windebank

Col. George Reade * (1608 - 1671)
Son of Mildred Windebank and Robert Reade

Andrew Reid * (1640 - 1697)
Son of Col. George Reade and Elizabeth Martin (Martiau)

Andrew Reid * (1664 - )
Son of Andrew Reid and Unknown

Jean Reid * (1688 - 1778)
Daughter of Andrew Reid and Isabelle Barr

Jean Reid (or Reed) * (1759 - 1830)
Daughter of Jean Reid and John Reid

James Stewart * (1783 - 1857)
Son of Jean Reid and James Stewart

Noah Stewart * (1828 - 1897)
Son of James Stewart Phoebe Hinton Cox

Mary Lou Ella Stewart * (1883 - 1938)
Daughter of Noah Stewart and Mary Springer

Doran Edgar Lute * (1901 - 1982)
Son of Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute


 

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Anne Tailboys (1516-1566)

Anne Tailboys Dymoke, brought more royal ancestry to our tree.  She was descended from two sons of King Edward III, Lionel, Duke of Clarence and John, Duke of Clarence.

Americans of Royal Descent: A Collection of Genealogies of American Families Whose Lineage is Traced to the Legimate Issue of Kings"; By Charles Henry Browning; Published by Porter & Costes, 1891.






Anne Tailboys *Lady (1516 - 1566)
is our 10th great grandmother
Daughter of Lady Anne Tailboys and Sir Edward Dymoke
Daughter of Frances Dymoke and Thomas Windebank
Son of Mildred Windebank and Robert Reade
Son of Col. George Reade and Elizabeth Martin(Martiau)
Son of Andrew Reid and Unknown
Daughter of Andrew Reid and Isabelle Barr
Daughter of Jean Reid and John Reid
Son of Jean
Son of James Stewart and Jean Reid
Daughter of Noah Stewart and Mary Springer
Son of Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute


Frances Dymoke (1550-1611)

Frances was born 1550 Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire, England, d. c1611. She married Thomas WINDEBANK, lord of the Manor of Haines Hall, Berks, England, in Scrivelsby, Lincolnshire, England. He was knighted in 1603. Farnham, George F. - "Quorndon records", printed in London: Mitchell Hughes and Clarke, 1912, page 345: "The late Queen Elizabeth, being thus seised of the said Reversion, did by indenture date 12th Feb 1583 (26 Elizabeth) grant unto the said Thomas Windebanke, for a term of 30 years, to begin at the expiration of the said lease at the former reserved rent of 41pounds 4sterling." http://www.gordonbanks.com/gordon/family/Lewis_&_Clark/Lewis.html -
Frances Dymoke was the daughter of Sir Edward Dymoke, Knight and Anne Tailboys. She married Sir Thomas Windebank, Knight, b. January 20, 1547/48, d. October 24, 1607, a son of Richard Windebank and Margaret verch Griffith, on 20 August 1566. She died after 3 March 1611.
Scrivelsby Manor Lincolnshire
Frances Dymoke * (1539 - 1611)
is our 9th great grandmother
Daughter of Frances Dymoke and Thomas Windebank
Son of Mildred Windebank and Robert Reade
Son of Col. George Reade and Elizabeth Martin (Martiau)
Son of Andrew Reid and Unknown
Daughter of Andrew Reid and Isabelle Barr
Daughter of Jean Reid and John Reed
Son of Jean Reid and James Stewart
Son of James James Stewart and Phoebe Hintin Cox
Daughter of Noah Stewart and Mary Springer
Son of Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute



Monday, December 10, 2012

Mildred Windebank (1585-1630)

Mildred Windebank
Mildred was Robert's third wife, married 31/7/1600. "Robert Reade married (third), in 1600, at St. Martins-in-the-field, London, Mildred Windebank, daughter of Sir Thomas Windebank, of Haines Hall, Parish of Hurst, Berkshire, who was clerk of the signet to Queen Elizabeth and King James I. Sir Thomas Windebank married Lady Frances Dymoke, daughter of Sir Edward Dymoke, of Scrivelsby Court, Lincolnshire, Hereditary Championn of England, and his wife, Lady Anne Talbois. Lady Frances Dymoke was of most distinguished lineage, as she was descended in three ways from King Edward I: from the Percys, Earls of Northumberland; the de Veres of Runnymede fame; and from Robert Marmyun, Lord of Castle Fontenaye in Normandy. Robert Marmyun accompanied William the Conquerer to England and was the Champion in full armor at the coronation of William and Matilda. He received the lands and Manor of Scrivelsby as a gift from William on the special condition that he and his heirs should perform the office of Champions to Sovereigns of England, a custom which was followed until the last two coronations. The Marmyun line died out with Lady Joan, but her daughter, Margaret Ludlow, married Sir John Dymoke, and this office continued in the Dymokke family. There are still extant a number of autographed letters from the Sovereigns of England to these Champions. Scrivelsby Court itself has a distinction, as it is the "Locksley Hall" of Tennyson's poems."
Mildred married Robert Reade Esq.-[18565] [MRIN:6357] on 7-31-1600 in St. Martin, Westminster, Lindon. Robert was born in 1551 in Linkenholt Manor, Hampshire, England and died after 12-10-1626 in Linkenholt Manor, Hampshire, England.
Frances Dymoke252,
 Ann Tailboys235,
 Elizabeth Gascoigne218,
 Margaret Percy200,
Henry de Percy IX184,
Eleanor de Neville161,
Joan de Beaufort141,
 Duke John of Lancaster "of Gaunt"114,
King Edward Plantagenet III95,
King Edward Plantagenet II82,
 King Edward I Plantagenet "Longshanks"72,
 King Henry III Plantagenet69,
King John Plantagenet "Lackland"66,
King Henry II Plantagenet "Curtmantle"52,
Queen Matilda Adelaide of England45,
Henry I (King)21,
William I "the Conqueror" (King)11,
Robert I "The Magnificent" (Duke)6,
Richard "the Good" II (Duke)3,
Richard I "The Fearless" (Duke)2,
William I "Longsword" (Duke)1) was born c1584 in England and died c1630 in Virginia at age 46.
Mildred married Robert Reade Esq.-[18565] [MRIN:6357] on 7-31-1600 in St. Martin, Westminster, Lindon. Robert was born in 1551 in Linkenholt Manor, Hampshire, England and died after 12-10-1626 in Linkenholt Manor, Hampshire, England.
Mildred Windebank * (1585 - 1630)
is our 8th great grandmother
Son of Mildred Windebank and Robert Reade
Son of Col. George Reade and Elizabeth Martin (Martiau)
Son of Andrew Reid and Unknown
Daughter of Andrew Reid and Isabelle Barr
Daughter of Jean Reid and John Reid
Son of Jean Reid and James Stewart
Son of James Stewart and Phoebe Hintin Cox
Daughter of Noah Stewart and Mary Springer
Son of Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute
http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/37400516/photo/F2ElJpkOpCChA5vPrBIhiLKYZ1Bw1tfAKFOKHwlOMe3N1R8nQ!3mOncQOO1RzyE_

Robert Reade (1551-1636)

          
Mildred was Robert's third wife, married 31/7/1600. "Robert Reade married (third), in 1600, at St. Martins-in-the-field, London, Mildred Windebank, daughter of Sir Thomas Windebank, of Haines Hall, Parish of Hurst, Berkshire, who was clerk of the signet to Queen Elizabeth and King James I. Sir Thomas Windebank married Lady Frances Dymoke, daughter of Sir Edward Dymoke, of Scrivelsby Court, Lincolnshire, Hereditary Championn of England, and his wife, Lady Anne Talbois. Lady Frances Dymoke was of most distinguished lineage, as she was descended in three ways from King Edward I: from the Percys, Earls of Northumberland; the de Veres of Runnymede fame; and from Robert Marmyun, Lord of Castle Fontenaye in Normandy. Robert Marmyun accompanied William the Conquerer to England and was the Champion in full armor at the coronation of William and Matilda. He received the lands and Manor of Scrivelsby as a gift from William on the special condition that he and his heirs should perform the office of Champions to Sovereigns of England, a custom which was followed until the last two coronations. The Marmyun line died out with Lady Joan, but her daughter, Margaret Ludlow, married Sir John Dymoke, and this office continued in the Dymokke family. There are still extant a number of autographed letters from the Sovereigns of England to these Champions. Scrivelsby Court itself has a distinction, as it is the "Locksley Hall" of Tennyson's poems."

From: http://www.geocities.com/awoodlief/reade.html Robert Reade (--by 12/1626) & Mildred Windebank

Robert Reade * (1551 - 1636)
is our 8th great grandfather
Son of Robert Reade and Mildred Windebank
Son of Col. George Reade and Elizabeth Martin (Martiau)
Son of Andrew Reid and Unknown
Daughter of Andrew Reid and Isabelle Barr
Daughter of Jean Reid and John Reid
Son of Jean Reid and James Stewart
Son of James Stewart and Phebe Hinton Cox
Daughter of Noah Stewart
Son of Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute


Margaret Miller (1644-1728)


Birth: 1644
Death: May 1, 1728
Margaret Miller Reid was born 1644 in Kirkintilloch, Dumbartonshire, Scotland. She married John Reid 29 Sep 1678. She was the mother of Anne Reid born 24 Jan 1679. Margaret came to the New World with her husband and three children in 1683 settling in New Jersey.  
Burial: Topanemus Episcopal Burial Ground MarlboroMonmouth CountyNew Jersey, USA
Record added: Aug 19, 2004 Find A Grave Memorial# 9338914



Margaret Miller * (1644 - 1728)
is our 5th great grandmother
Son of Margaret Miller and John Reid
Daughter of John Reid and Jean Reid
Son of Jean Reid and James Stewart
Son of James Stewart and Pheobe Hintin Cox
Daughter of Noah Stewart and Mary Springer
Son of Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute


Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Col. George Reade (1608 - 1671)

George Reade Esq. was one of the more colorful early colonists in New England, integrally bound up in the early politics, as well as being an ancestor of George Washington. His lineage has been thoroughly researched by US historians, because of his pivotal role in US history.
George Reade, a native of London, came to Virginia 1637 in Sir John Harvey's party.  Harvey was returning to Virginia to assume the office of Governor of the Colony.  Reade was appointed Secretary of State, pro tem of the colony in 1640 and served as Acting Governor in the absence of Governor Harvey.  He was a member of the House of Burgesses and a member of the Colonial Council until his death.  His will, no longer extant, is documented in a York County 18th century land transaction.
 
York Co, VA Deeds & Bonds Book 5 pp 3 - 6 This Indenture made the sixteenth day of May in the fortieth year of the Reign of our Sovernge Lord George the Second King of Great Britain and in the year of our Lord Christ one thousand seven hundred & forty one between James Mitchell of the Town & County of York and Janet his wife of the one part and Richard Ambler of the same Town & county aforesaid . Whereas George Reade late of the sd county of York Esq decd being siezed in fee of a certain tract or parcel of land lying & being in the said County of York containing by Estimation Eight hundred & fifty acres did by his last Will and Testament in writing bearing date the twenty ninth day of September in the Year of our Lord One thousand six hundred & Seventy devise the same by the name of all that Tract of Land wherein he lived to his wife during life and after her decease to be equally divided between his sons, George & Robert and the heirs of their bodies but and fault of such heirs in either or both of them or in case either or both of them should dye during their minority then he gave and devises his and their parts of the land aforesaid to his sons Francis and Benjamin and the heirs of their bodies with other remainders over as by the said Will duly proved in the General Court of this Colony being thereunto had may more at large appear and whereas the said George Reade one of the sons of the Testator dyed many years ago without issue and after his death the said Francis & Benjamin Reade intend into one ninety or half part of this premises to as afore devised and afterwards the said Robert Reade, Francis Reade & Benjamin Reade by Deed bearing date the twelfth day of November in the Year of our Lord one thousand and six hundred & eighty eight made partition of the premises aforesaid .........
George Reade married Elizabeth Martiau, daughter of Nicolas Martiau (Father of Yorktown).  Their daughter Mildred, wife of Col. Augustine Warner, was the g-grandmother of George Washington. George Read, the son of Robert Read of London and his wife Mildred Windebank, was one of the about one hundred colonists, who emigrated to the colonies from England and Wales before the end of the 17th century, known to have legitimate descent from a Plantagenet King of England.  The illustrious ancestry of George Reade is documented nicely in Colonial Records during the period of 18 January 1638/9 - 11 December 1641.  The file includes letters from the Colonial Governor, Secretary of State and George Reade to Sir Francis Windebank and/or Windebank's personal secretary Robert Reade (George Reade's brother.)  The correspondence file is quite interesting, alluding to the politics behind George Reade's appointment as Secretary of State during Richard Kemp's sojourn in England.  It also includes personal requests from George Reade to his brother for servants and money.  Earlier correspondence puts a personal face on George Reade's life.  "Sir John Harvey to Robert Reade, 17 Nov. 1637.  Hopes to employ Reade's brother against the Indians.  He is well and stays at the writer's house."  "George Reade to Robert Reade, his brother, 26 Febr. 1637/8.  Does not think much of Mr. Hawley.  Thanks to the support of the Governor and Mr. Kemp, the writer has survived.  Mr. Menephe has brought many servants.  Mr. Hawley has promised the writer that the next lot of servants coming to Virginia would be for him but he does not believe it as Hawley is in Maryland."
"Adventurers of Purse and Person 1607 - 1624/5 and Their Families" published by the Order of First Families of Virginia, indicates in a footnote (pp. 419-420) the discrepancy between the dates inscribed on his Grace Church tablets and the filing of the wills for George Read and his wife Elizabeth as follows:  "His and his wife's gravestones were discovered during street excavations in Yorktown in 1931.  The inscriptions on both were recut with errors.  George Reade's stone now states he died Oct. 1674, "he being in the 66th yr of his age."  Since the date should be 1671 (per his will), either the age shown, or his year of birth, is in error as well....The gravestone of Elizabeth (Martiau) Read now states she was born in 1625 and died in 1696, "being in ye 71st yeare of her age."  Since the year of death should be 1686 (per her will), again the age or year of birth is in error.  Since Nicholas Martiau claimed...his daughter Elizabeth as headrights...it would appear Elizabeth was born prior to his arrival in Virginia in 1620...and that Elizabeth's birth occurred in 1615 rather than 1625."
The graves of George Reade and his wife Elizabeth were discovered while excavating on Buckner Street in Yorktown.  In 1931, descendant Letitia Pate Evans had the tablets restored and moved to the church yard of Grace Episcopal Church.   The Reade tablets sit adjacent to the plots of Gov. Thomas Nelson (Declaration of Independence signer), his father, and grandfather (who married a George Reade descendant.)

Descendants of Col. George Reade

Generation No. 1
1. Col. George1 Reade, Col. (RobertA, AndrewB) was born Bet. 1605 - 1608 in Linkenholt, Hampshire, England1,2, and died Bef. 21 Nov 1671 in York Co, VA3,4. He married Elizabeth Martiau Abt. 16415, daughter of Nicolas Martiau.  She  died Bef. 24 Jan 1686/87 in York Co, VA7,8.
  Children of George Reade and Elizabeth Martiau are:
+ 2 i. Elizabeth2 Reade, died 18 Nov 1717 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA.
+ 3 ii. Mildred Reade, died 1694.
4 iii. George Reade.
+ 5 iv. Robert Reade, died Bef. 16 Mar 1722/23 in York Co, VA.
+ 6 v. Thomas Reade.
+ 7 vi. Francis Reade, died Abt. 1694.
8 vii. Benjamin Reade. He married Mary (Gwynn?).

Generation No. 2

2. Elizabeth2 Reade (George1, RobertA, AndrewB) died 18 Nov 1717 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA9,10. She married Captain Thomas Chisman, son of Edmund Chisman and Mary. He was born Abt. 1651 in Virginia11, and died Bef. 18 Jul 1715 in York Co, VA11.
  Children of Elizabeth Reade and Thomas Chisman are:
9 i. Thomas3 Chisman, Capt., died 11 Dec 1722 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA12,13,14. He married Anne15.
10 ii. Mary Chisman, died 22 Jan 1719/20 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA16. She married Edward Athey.
11 iii. Mildred Chisman, born 19 Feb 1675/76 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA17,18,19. She married Lawrence Smith, Col; died 27 Feb 1738/39 in York Co, VA20,21.
12 iv. Elizabeth Chisman, born 08 Nov 1681 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA22,23. She married Unknown Lucas24.
13 v. Col. John Chisman, born 04 Mar 1682/83 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA25,26; died 19 Sep 1728 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA26,27. He married Ellinor Hayward28 22 Dec 1708 in York Co, VA29,30; born 25 Jul 1690 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA31,32; died 08 Feb 1767 in York Co, VA33.
14 vi. Jane Chisman, born 21 Mar 1686/87 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA34,35,36.
15 vii. George Chisman, born 05 Jan 1688/89 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA37,38,39; died 06 Oct 1710 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA39,40.
16 viii. Sarah Chisman, born 02 May 1690 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA41,42,43.
17 ix. Anne Chisman, born 20 Dec 1692 in Charles Parish, York Co, VA44,45,46.
  3. Mildred2 Reade (George1, RobertA, AndrewB) died 1694. She married Col. Augustine Warner, son of Augustine Warner and Mary Towneley. He was born 03 Jun 164247, and died 19 Jun 168147.
  Children of Mildred Reade and Augustine Warner are:
18 i. George3 Warner.
19 ii. Robert Warner.
20 iii. Mildred Warner, died 1701 in Whitehaven, England48,49. She married (1) Laurence Washington. She married (2) George Gayle.
21 iv. Elizabeth Warner. She married John Lewis.
22 v. Mary Warner.
23 vi. Isabella Warner, born 24 Nov 1672 in Chesake, Virginia50; died 06 Feb 1719/2050. She married John Lewis, Major; born 30 Nov 166950; died 14 Nov 172550.


Col. George Reade * (1608 - 1671)

is our 7th great grandfather
Son of Col. George Reade
Son of Andrew Reid
Daughter of Andrew Reid
Daughter of Jean Reid
Son of Jean Reid
Son of James Stewart
Daughter of Noah Stewart
Son of
 Mary Lou Ella Stewart and Charles William Lute